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Health Advances

Israel performs first-ever augmented reality, 3D eye socket surgery

Surgeons are seen examining a model skull ahead of eye surgery using AR technology.(photo credit: ROEY BELHANAS/DENTAL PRO VIDEO)

By Maaayan Jaffe-Hofffman
December 31, 2020

“The innovative technology utilizing a 3D printer and augmented reality resulted in a both a particularly accurate execution of the operation, and a significant reduction in time.”

“The future is already here,” according to Prof. Masad Barhoumm the director-general of Galilee Medical Center, after a team of Israeli doctors from his medical center successfully completed the first-ever repair of a fracture in the floor of an eye socket using augmented reality (AR) and three-dimensional technology.

The surgery, which was performed on a 31-year-old resident of the Galilee, was led by Prof. Samer Srouji of Galilee Medical Center’s Center for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in partnership with doctors from Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer.

The patient had been severely injured in his face, fracturing his left eye socket, resulting in double vision and impairing the aesthetics and symmetry of his eyes.

“The innovative technology utilizing a 3D printer and augmented reality resulted in a both a particularly accurate execution of the operation, and a significant reduction in time,” said Srouji.

To perform the surgery, the medical center designed a plate according to the patient’s computerized tomography (CT) scan. The plate accurately reproduced the shape of the floor of the eye socket, according to the “projection” of the healthy side on the injured side, though use of software to build a three-dimensional model of his skull.

The plate was printed on titanium and prepared for insertion. To accurately position it under the patient’s eye, doctors used AR.

One of the doctors wore Microsoft “HoloLens” glasses that were connected to the computer software containing the patient’s models – both the skull and the plate design. The model was virtually and accurately placed over the patient’s head through the glasses, which enabled the surgeon to place the plate in place correctly in real time.

Full Story

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